Comet Pin Protype

Here’s a little comet pin that I made from copper wire and heated quartz rock crystal. It measures about an inch and a half long and has a wire wrapped c-clasp.

000 comet pin

Hopefully I will have time to make one in sterling soon!

I am on a mission this year to continue the comet jewelry tradition of jewelers of olde. Hopefully Comet ISON will help me celebrate my current comet obsession. We should know more by Halloween. Fingers crossed!

Black Dot Paste

000 comet black dotI purchased this sweet little (late Victorian?) 10k comet pin online. The photo was terrible, and so I was delighted when I got to view this piece in person (or shall I say “in pin”?). Anyway, after taking the above photo I noticed that it has a “black dot paste” gem. Cool!

Paste, in case you don’t know, is basically glass that has been treated as a gemstone. Antique “paste” is very special because it was not mass produced like today’s glass stones are. Black dot paste is a paste stone that has a tiny black dot painted on the bottom. This is supposed to mimic the open culet of early diamond cuts.

I don’t normally purchase items online that have terrible pictures, but this time I lucked out! 🙂

Eta Aquarid Meteor Shower

It was too sunny on the West Coast of the USA to see the Eta Aquarid meteor shower from Halley’s Comet last night, but I went outside anyway and took this picture of the two labradorite comet necklaces I made on Saturday. The background art is a vintage Halley’s Comet postcard from 1910. 🙂

00 lab comets

 

 

Comet Pin?

00 40s comet

I picked up this pin on eBay for around $6.00. It is made of base metal and rhinestone, and is probably from the 1940s. I think that it might be a comet pin because it reminds me of the first comet in this illustration from Johannes Hevelius’ Cometographia (Danzig, 1668). What do you think?

cometsImage credit: NASA/JPL – http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/deepimpact/media/f_ancient.html

 

 

00 wish comet

The comet necklace above is the most recent rendition of my design. It is made of recycled sterling silver and natural quartz crystal (heated to the point of crackling). I’m really pleased with how it turned out. It’s more vibrant than the snow quartz. Click on the photo for a larger view, or visit my Etsy shop for more pictures: http://www.etsy.com/listing/126929706/comet-of-life-necklace-sterling-silver?

The card that my comet is sitting on is a replica of a 1910 Halley’s Comet commemorative postcard. I got it from Stuart Schneider, co-author of the book Halley’s Comet – Memories of 1910. He has a really great website about comet memorabilia. If you like my comets (creations and/or collection), then prepare to fall in love: http://wordcraft.net/comets1.html

Ethora’s Comet

00 comet silver

Humans have been making comet jewelry for hundreds of years, and Halley’s Comet has been a particularly rich source of inspiration for jewelers from the Georgian to the Victorian eras. When I first began collecting antique comet jewelry, I lamented the fact that I will probably be too old to work with wire the next time Halley’s Comet comes around. But then, I learned about the ISON comet that is supposed to be spectacular at the the end of this year (and, hello, Pan-STARRS comet!)! To me, this was a sign that I should not let Halley’s schedule get in the way of creating my own version of the comet.

Here is my version of a comet. I crafted this necklace from recycled sterling silver wire, sterling silver chain, and natural snow quartz. Comets consist of rock and ice, hence my choice of gemstone. I am excited about this design. and have plans to expand it further. In the meantime, I will share some of my collection of vintage comet jewelry here. Stay tuned!